LooThe Roseate Spoonbill is one of the most sought-after species by Florida's bird enthusiasts.king for some of the best birding in Florida? Choose to make a 3-bedroom condo in Perdido Key your official headquarters! This sub-tropical locale in the Panhandle encourages you to appreciate all the diversity of its habitats - from pinewoods and beaches to saltwater marshes and open woodlands - that make it attractive to both native and migratory bird species.

Florida's public and private lands support these ecosystems, and make Perdido Key an ideal spot for birds to breed, rest and refuel for their long journey south. As such, it's a haven for bird watchers. Although you could see more than 200 bird species in Perdido Key, here are some of the most sought-after to keep an eye out for:

Yellow-breasted chat
This lovely songbird prefers to spend its time in the dense brush, so it's fun to finally spot it - especially since this area is not a common location. You'll know the adult by its bright yellow chest and throat, white belly and white around its eyes. Listen for the cheeps and whistles as a clue to its whereabouts during May and again July through September.

Gray kingbird
These conspicuous birds will be hard not to notice if you're visiting Perdido Key between April and October. Large-billed and vocal, gray kingbirds can be found along Florida's coastline, waiting for large insects to fly by. They also eat other small vertebrates, including lizards, and occasionally fruit. Look for these birds in mangroves and open coastal woodlands.

Roseate spoonbill
One of Florida's most distinguished wading birds, the roseate spoonbill is often confused with the flamingo because of its spectacular pink plumage. The two are not related, and the main difference between this bird and the iconic flamingo is its bill - flat and spatula-like. The bird uses this unique bill to feed on fish, crustaceans and aquatic insects. Look for the spoonbill during May in coastal wetlands like those in Big Lagoon State Park.